Moving to Savannah: Tips on Where to Live When You’ve Been Transferred to Hunter Army/Air Force Base

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Savannah brings to mind pleasant pictures of umbrellas on sandy beaches, cruising on a boat through waving marsh grasses and the ultimate pleasure of Southern cooking. Barbecue and potato salad aside, though, Savannah usually means plantation style homes reminiscent of Tara, the slow Southern way of life and adorable accents. Not many people think of Savannah when they think of big industry, but they should. In fact, entrepreneurial enterprises constitute one-third of the businesses in Savannah. Not many people recognize the military presence in Savannah, either, but they should. If you’re being transferred to Hunter Army/Air Force Base, there will be plenty of work for family members should they decide to seek it. Savannah is also home to pretty spectacular scenery as well as amazing attractions.

Where to Live

Moving to guides wax rhapsodic on the wonders of the South Side of Savannah. To be fair, the most imaginative and best quality modern homes are to be found there. The trouble with the town is that it is packed. This means that its two main arteries, Highway 204 and Interstate 95, are also packed. It is recommended for those moving to Savannah to live on its outskirts and commute to work. These outskirts are located in Bryan County and Effingham County, where many members of the military and professions live. In Effingham County, residents will take Highway 21 to Savannah, while in Bryan County, Highway 204 will be your path to town.

The benefits of living in Bryan or Effingham Counties encompass wide open spaces, fresh air unaccompanied by industrial and automobile fumes, good hospitals, shopping and food, better quality schools than those in Chatham County, and much less pressure on an already stressed infrastructure, despite Savannah’s best efforts at bypass road-building. It is quiet outside Chatham County, without noise from traffic, marauding bands of youths with the bass thumping in their cars or sirens blasting at all hours.

In Bryan County, you will want to check out the communities of Eden, Faulkville and Ellabell. These communities use Highway 280 to reach I-95 into town. Effingham County offers newcomers the quiet towns of Guyton and Springfield for their consideration. Both use Highway 21 to get to Savannah. Both offer excellent schools, hospitals, food and shopping. Commute times depend on how far outside Chatham County you choose to reside. Most people find their commute to be from 20 minutes to perhaps 45, depending on traffic and time of day. We know the military isn’t always a 9 to 5 matter.

What about the Scenery?

Some of Savannah’s most majestic scenery is best viewed from the deck of a paddle-wheeler like the Georgia Queen. Since most modern cities were born on the water, it stands to reason that the water would be the best place to view a city. You’ll hear how Savannah was founded as well as pertinent points about River Street, The Waving Girl and Forts Jackson and Pulaski.

On the ground, however, are some of the most stunning green spaces in the state of Georgia. Forsyth Park in downtown Savannah was established in the mid-1800s. Its fountain is based on the fountain in Paris, France and was copied for use in Peru. Only Daffin Park in central Savannah exceeds Forsyth Park’s acreage. For the newcomer to Georgia, the state’s trees dressed in trailing Spanish moss is an amazing sight. Skidaway State Park offers new residents acres and acres of trees dripping Spanish moss right beside the river. There is plenty of room for a picnic followed by a game of touch football. Fishing in the river is equally relaxing. If you’ve been transferred to Hunter Army/Air Force Base and wish to view a real live plantation, then you’re in luck. Wormsloe Plantation is the home of one of the original settlers. Now a ruin, it was built in the 1700s. Visitors may view a movie describing the settlement’s beginnings in addition to walking around grounds whose beauty will leave you breathless. It isn’t Tara, but an avenue of ancient oaks (complete with moss) will lead you to the museum.

Anything to Do in Savannah?

Give a Southerner a reason, and he’ll throw a parade, party or festival. Since Savannah was founded, many nationalities have been represented there. On River Street in October, for example, Oktoberfest and TAD of Savannah are opportunities for newcomers and residents alike to sample exquisite foods and other products from different areas. People come from all over the world to watch the St. Patrick’s Day Parade, the second largest in the nation. The Wearin‘ o’ the Green is fair game for everyone on that day. Drink green beer, eat green eggs and ham (even if you’re not feeling “green” that day, Sam I Am) and wave green pinwheels as you dance along River Street. Food isn’t all there is to Savannah, though, as you will see when you take haunted tours, hear the stories of the old homes in Savannah and tour the original buildings on one of Savannah’s many streetcar tours.

Move to guides are good for basic information, but when it comes to moving, you need an expert. We’ll tell you lots more fascinating things about Savannah when you contact us to learn more about it.

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